FREE Download: Mental Ward: Experiments | May 25-29 | Only on Amazon!

The Sirens Song

Free Download

May 25th – 29th on Amazon!

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Mental Ward: Experiments

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We’ll take fine care of your loved one – no need to worry…

A dank basement, shadow filled hallways, the deep echo of a metal latch being thrown while faint screams are heard… These are the things you might experience in a place where the unspeakable happens, where conscientious action and moral turpitude turn a blind eye in the interest of advancing one’s own personal pursuits in the most deranged and unjustifiable manner. The type of place where power corrupts, and depravity runs rampant among those imbued with it. A place where the unfortunate are abandoned to the devices of those who convince themselves their actions are in the best interest of science.

Mental Ward: Experiments is a collection of ten short stories that demonstrate the worst of humanity’s ambition in the interest of ‘civilized’ advancement. Step into a…

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FREE Download: Wicked Deeds | May 15-19 | Only on Amazon!

FREE for 5 days!

The Sirens Song

Free Download

May 15th – 19th on Amazon!

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Wicked Deeds
Witches, Warlocks, Demons and Other Evil Doers

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Sometimes wicked people do wicked things simply because they can…

The twelve stories in Wicked Deeds tell tales of witches and warlocks with ill intent, devilish demons bent on destruction, and other doers of evil who make the world a terrifying place.

What is a mother to do when her daughter is gifted but lives under the thumb of her fanatical preacher husband who will brook no talk of the supernatural? What of a demon so desperate to free himself of a trap that he will force another to repeat his atrocities and condemn a young boy to his demonic fate? Or maybe the story of a crotchety old witch with a score to settle against the town she lives in is more to your liking – what evil will the seemingly harmless…

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FREE Download: Through Clouded Eyes | May 10-14 | Only on Amazon!

FREE for 5 days! ‘Through Clouded Eyes’, an anthology from Sirens Call Publications.

The Sirens Song

Free Download

May 10th – 14th on Amazon!

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Through Clouded Eyes
A Zombies Point of View

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Through Clouded Eyes: A Zombie’s Point of View: a collection of twelve stories told from the Zombie’s perspective.

They’re shambling toward you, feet dragging on the broken roadway. Arms outstretched, faces slack, they move as if they’re tracking your scent on the wind. You want to run, but you know there’s nowhere to hide.

Aware of their insatiable hunger, fear paralyzes you. These things were once human, people someone loved. Is there anything left inside them – some sliver of humanity that may save you from this nightmare? Your mind doesn’t want to accept the inevitable, a single thought consumes you: what are they thinking?

With your chance of escape dwindling, you snap out of it and run like hell knowing there is little to no hope; fate is coming for you. Soon…

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Free Kindle Book! — What Dwells Below

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What Dwells Below — free download available for 5 days!

The 12 tales in this anthology explore urban horrors waiting just below our feet…

Visit Amazon to grab a copy before the giveaway ends!

Get it here, on Amazon!

Judging Hellraiser: Judgment

As a long-time fan of the Hellraiser franchise, I had to watch this one. But I was hesitant to do so after the saturation of not-so-great Hellraiser movies. I’m not saying they’re complete garbage—some of them have their own charm—but the first two resonate with me in a way none of the others can.

If you haven’t read Clive Barker’s The Hellbound Heart I strongly encourage you to!

I won’t say that Judgment was the worst of the franchise. But I think it doesn’t belong there.

First off, any Hellraiser without Doug Bradley as Pinhead just doesn’t work for me. When the same actor has played a character for so long, it’s a hell of a thing to try and get the same effect with another actor. No matter their skill, it just isn’t the same. Another actor playing Pinhead is like someone other than Hugh Jackman playing Wolverine. No matter how badass they are at the role, the original character has been the same actor for way too long for it to really work.

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I will say this, Paul Taylor didn’t do a bad job as Pinhead. He had kind of a Doug Bradley look and his voice and tone weren’t a deterrent to his performance. I was less disappointed with him than I thought I’d be. But like I said, I can’t see Pinhead as anyone but Doug Bradley.

There are some great things about this movie. And some not so great things as well.

The trailer for it looked promising, though I didn’t trust it. My mistrust was justified. The entire trailer is made up of snippets from the first 15 minutes of the film, which really, was the only truly enjoyable part of the experience. It then goes into a long, slow, boring story about some detectives investigating a serial killer. That’s the first place this movie went wrong. Too much talk, not enough… anything else.

If you manage to stay awake through the dialogue that doesn’t carry any real weight to the story, you’ll get to see some scenes that are worthwhile.

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The man with the cut-up face and dark glasses was a great character! He was probably the best part of the entire movie. At first I wasn’t sure if he was human or a cenobite, and to be honest I’m still not completely sure. No spoilers, but I’m leaning more towards one of those conclusions than the other.

The entire idea of that character and his role in the story was the only thing that made Hellraiser: Judgment worth watching. If the story revolved around him it probably would have been a better movie. They focused too much on the less interesting aspects of the story (as well as trying to make it a Hellraiser movie by throwing bits and pieces of its history in without any true meaning). I won’t spoil it for you, but there were some really great ideas that were wasted.

I think if they removed the cenobites, took the name Hellraiser out of the title completely, and got rid of the boring dialogue, it could have been a great film. On its own, it had potential. Hellraiser: Judgment’s biggest downfall is that they slapped the franchise onto a movie that could have done well on its own. Excuse the pun, but that brought judgment down hard on a movie that might not have been looked at so harshly otherwise.

If you’re a die-hard fan of Hellraiser, you’re probably not going to like how it ends. I certainly did not. There’s only one positive side to its ending: they can’t do it again…

But don’t let my bad review stop you from enjoying this film. I enjoyed some of it (it really did have some good scenes), but it was a watch-once and never bother with it again deal for me. My best advice, see it for yourself and pass your own judgment.

If you enjoyed this article, please follow my blog for more movie reviews, articles, and all things horror!

 

Best Episodes of Black Mirror

 

The best advice I can give to you if you haven’t seen the show already, is to not watch Season 1, Episode 1, The National Anthem. Trust me, you probably don’t want to see that…

The strange thing I noticed about this show is that the seasons and episodes are listed backwards on Netflix. Usually when you go to a show, the first season is listed at the top, and episodes follow in a top-down format. This show lists the latest season first, and has the previous seasons below it. I think it might be an intentional way to avoid people from seeing The National Anthem first. It could definitely ruin the show for a lot of people, making them not want to watch any more episodes if they’d seen that first. A lot of the episodes are hit and miss, many not appealing to everyone.

That’s why I’ve put together this list for the horror fans out there. To filter out the stuff you might want to skip. By all means, watch the whole series; I did. But some episodes I enjoyed more than others.

Either way, here is my list of recommendations:

 

Season 2, Episode 2: White Bear

I have to say this is probably my favorite of all the episodes in regards to horror. Great story, atmosphere, pacing, and ending.

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Season 4, Episode 5: Metalhead

This is my second favorite. Post-apocalyptic scenereo with robots? Yes please! Again, great story, atmosphere (they did this one entirely in black and white), pacing, and ending. One of the best in the series.

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Season 4, Episode 6: Black Museum

If you plan to watch the entire series, you should probably save this one for last. But the way the show is constructed, it doesn’t really matter. You’ll get the story. (There are just a few easter eggs in the episode you may see if you’ve watched other episodes).

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Season 3, Episode 5: Men Against Fire

This is also a great episode. Has its fair share of horror and a good ending.

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Season 2, Episode 4: White Christmas

This one strikes hard on fear of time. The cruelty of what occurs made me cringe.

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Season 4, Episode 1: USS Callister

This one isn’t necessarily horror (it has its moments), but as a Star Trek fan it’s something I can’t ignore. By far one of the best Star Trek inspired pieces I’ve ever seen. Even if you’ve never seen Star Trek, it’s an enjoyable episode.

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Hope you enjoy the show! And fair warning: don’t watch The National Anthem.

Still Dark by D.W. Gillespie – Creepy Roads, Take Me Home…

Today I’ll be hosting D.W. Gillespie on my blog in celebration of his novel, Still Dark. I personally read this book and fell in love with it immediately. That’s why I’m here to share this novel with you, and show the author support for this great story. I promise you’d be missing out not adding this to your to-read list!

Now for a few words by the author:

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Creepy Roads, Take Me Home…

by D.W. Gillespie

With the release of my first novel, Still Dark, I’ve been thinking a lot about the different sources of inspiration over the years. I keep coming back to how important my environment has been in shaping my work. It’s not just the metaphorical environment, such as my family, friends, social status and all that. It’s the literal environment too.

Still Dark is set in and around Gatlinburg Tennessee, a few hours away from where I grew up. It’s a place that’s a ripe setting for horror stories. The mountains, the empty, quiet woods, the abandoned barns set in wide open fields. There are ghosts everywhere in those parts, whether you believe in ghosts or not.

I spent a lot of time at my grandparent’s farm when I was a kid. The road was, well into the 90’s, still gravel, and I can still remember the feel of it as a kid, under my shoes, under the tires as I nodded off to sleep. At night, the trees seemed to meet over the top of the road, making a roof that stars or moon couldn’t quite shine through. All you had was the headlights marking the road just in front of you, and beyond that, well, there could be anything.

My imagination would run wild at the moonlight rippling on top of a pond. Of the sounds of an owl, lonesome and terrifying. The kids would play around the yard at night, and that seemed to help, the sounds of our voices almost chasing back the darkness. But it was all just a trick of the mind. The dark was still there, and if you walked over to the barbed wire fence, you could hear things out in the woods, pawing and hooting.

Things sort of changed when the sun wasn’t around. Way out in the darkness, there were trees so wide that a dozen people couldn’t reach all the way around it. There was a family cemetery, some of the stones hundreds of years old. There were dead ponds so thick with algae that you couldn’t even see the water. During the day, in the light, these were all curiosities worthy of study and exploration, but at night… only a fool would venture out there at night.

Now, I’m a grown man, and I know woods aren’t all that different at night as they are during the day. That sort of thinking, it’s for kids, isn’t it? And yet… I can still remember that feeling, how small and helpless I felt alone in the dark. I see it on my own kid’s faces from time to time.

That’s my environment, the land that helped make me. That open country world that still holds secrets to this day. It’s all over my writing, but especially in Still Dark.

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Still Dark

D.W. Gillespie

When a thunderous explosion rocks an idyllic cabin resort in the Great Smoky Mountains, animals and humans alike begin to act strange. Jim, along with his wife Laura and son, Sam, are cut off from the outside world, but they soon realize the true nightmare is just beginning…

Deep in the snow-covered woods, something is waiting. The creature calls itself Apex, and it’s a traveler. Reading the minds of those around it, Apex brings the terrifying fears hidden in the human psyche to life with a singular purpose: to kill any that stand in its way.

Locked in a fight for their lives, Jim and his family must uncover the truth behind Apex, and stop the creature from wreaking a horrifying fate upon the rest of the world!

Amazon Digital and Print: US | UK | Canada | Australia | Germany | France | Spain | Italy | Japan | Mexico| Brazil | India | The Netherlands

Kobo | Barnes & Noble (Digital or Print) | iTunes | Smashwords

ABOUT THE AUTHOR — D.W. Gillespie has been writing dark fiction in one form or another since he was old enough to hold a pencil. He’s been featured in multiple horror anthologies, both in print and online. Still Dark is his debut novel, and his second book, a short collection titled Handmade Monsters, arrives in 2017. He lives in Tennessee with his wife and two children.

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Channel Zero Review

 

It’s not often I write about a television series, but Channel Zero appealed to me five minutes into the first episode. I kept saying, “I’d die in this show, because I know damn well I’d be first in line to go in that house.”

Oddly enough, I’d never heard of the show at all. Of course, I don’t watch cable TV and it was on the Sci-Fi Channel (I know it’s SyFy now, but I refuse to accept that). I was introduced to it on New Year’s Eve by my date as something to watch during dinner. I’m glad we were done eating before certain parts… We ended up watching an entire season in one sitting. I started with the second season, No-End House, as she’d already seen the first, Candle Cove. It’s sort of like American Horror Story where each season is a completely different storyline so it doesn’t matter which one you watch first.

Both are great, but I felt Season 2 had a more fast-paced flow than Season 1. I’d almost recommend starting with Season 2, No-End House. Candle Cove moves a bit slow in the beginning, but keep watching. The end is worth it.

That’s one thing I’ll say about this show. They know how to make a good ending!

I’m surprised the show hasn’t gathered more attention. I feel it’s underrated, which is why I’m writing about it. Season 3 comes out soon, within a month or two from what I’ve read. I’m excited to see where they’re going to go with it!

I made this post short, as not to spoil the show for you with details. Just here to spread my love for a good horror series.

Feel free to comment and share your thoughts on the show if you’ve seen it.

Thanks for reading! And be sure to follow my blog for more horror-related stuff!

John Carpenter’s Remake of The Thing Wasn’t a Remake

There seems to be some disagreement and misinterpretation on John Carpenter’s The Thing. I’ve read it online, spoken about the movie with other fans (as it happens to be a personal favorite), and keep hearing how it was a remake of The Thing from Another World. As a hardcore fan of these movies, I felt compelled to write about them, and how this popular opinion is contrary to what appear to be facts.

There are three renditions of the film, The Thing. John Carpenter’s 1982 version is arguably the most popular, which by majority opinion is a remake of the original, The Thing from Another World, originally released in 1951. Another addition to the franchise was introduced in 2011, which was thought (depending on opinion) to be a prequel of John Carpenter’s or second remake of the original 1951 classic.

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The Thing from Another World 1951

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The Thing 1982

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The Thing 2011

 

So there are two remakes for the same film? Sure, it’s not unlike Hollywood to rehash the same thing (pun intended) more than a few times, but this isn’t the case. In the original 1951 story, scientists uncover an alien spacecraft buried under ice near an arctic research station where they work. They find an extraterrestrial pilot frozen in the ice and dig it out. The being accidentally gets thawed out, and things go downhill from there.

The story of John Carpenter’s 1982 version is in fact a sequel to the original. In the story, American scientists working at a different arctic research facility are startled by a helicopter coming toward their base, which is chasing a dog, a man firing at it with a rifle. The dog escapes unscathed and the helicopter pilot is killed in an accidental explosion while trying to kill the dog with a grenade.

When the American scientists go to the other research base to investigate the strange behavior of the unexpected visitors, they find the place deserted and mostly destroyed. They also find video footage of the scientists finding the spacecraft and the chunk of ice the creature originally escaped from.

This tells us that this is in fact a sequel, not a remake. It follows events which take place after the original film.

The 2011 version, again considered a remake, technically is. But not of the film most people associate it with. It’s not a remake of John Carpenter’s film, but of the original 1951 version. It’s the story of the Norwegian scientists who found and unleashed the alien in the first place. The movie even ends with the dog escaping (presumably thought to be the alien creature) while being chased by a helicopter. This movie could be considered a prequel to John Carpenter’s version, if anything, as it ties the events together more closely than the original 1951 version.

I hope this makes you want to watch and enjoy these movies again (or for the first time if you haven’t seen them), if only to see for yourself how they are truly connected.